An Incomplete List of Parallel Processors Efforts 20


Introduction
Over the years there has been an amazing number of of parallel computing efforts, will billions of dollars invested so far in R&D. There have been some bright spots for application specific parallel processors with limited programmability, but the success rate of general purpose parallel programmable processors is an approximate 0%. I compiled the the following list to stay sober regarding our own chances to succeed as a parallel processor company.  It shows most of the past, present, and future commercial efforts  in parallel computing. Please leave a comment if you have a correction or if you can help fill out some of the missing efforts.

Master List of Parallel Computing Efforts

Adapteva
Analog Devices-BlackFin
Altair
Altera
Ambric
AMD-APU
ARM-MP/Neon
ARM-Mali
Asocs
Aspex
AxisSemi
BOPS
Boston Circuits
Brightscale
Calxeda
Cavium
CEVA
Chameleon
Clearspeed
Cognimem
Cognivue
Cognovo
Coherent Logix
CoreSonic
CPUTech
Cradle
Cswitch
DesignArt
ElementCXI
EZChip
Freescale
Greenarrays
HP
IBM-Cell
IBM-Cyclopse
Icera-PowerVR
Imagination-PowerVR
Imec
Inmos-Transputer
Intel-TFLOPS
Intel-Larrabee
Intel-MIC
Intellasys
Intrinsity
IPFLex
Kalray
Mathstar
MobileEye
ModemArt
Morphics
Morpho
Movidius
NEC
Netlogic
Netronome
Nvidia
Octasic
PACT
Paneve
Picochip
Plurality
Quicksilver
Rapport
Raytheon-Monarch
Recore
Sandbridge
SiByte
SiCortex
Silicon Hive
Silicon Spice
Singular Computing
Sound Design
SpiralGateway
Stream Processors
Stretch
Tabula
Thinking Machines
TI
Tilera
TOPS
Venray
Xelerated
Xilinx
XMOS
Ziilabs


20 thoughts on “An Incomplete List of Parallel Processors Efforts

  • Reply
    Patrick Wood

    Sun (now Oracle) has several commercial multi-core servers. The T3 has 16 cores and runs 8 threads concurrently per core (using a HW time slice that’s handled in the instruction pipeline). I used a T1 years ago, and it worked quite well with plain vanilla pthreads code and C.

    • Reply
      Mark Boon

      (I send a ‘reply’ as ‘leaving a comment doesn’t seem to be working)
      You could maybe add Perihelion (failed Helios OS for transputers) and Sony as a success with their cell-architecture in the Sony Playstation 3?

  • Reply
    Pat Wood

    The Sun/Oracle Ultrasparc T3 has 16 cores with the ability to run 8 concurrent threads per core via a pipeline stage that schedules ready-to-run threads. This architecture has been around since the T1 (ca 2005), and the latest generation, the T5, was recently announced. I would put these in the commercial success column.

  • Reply
    frederic reblewski

    there was a company called TEJA. they sold tools and IP to create “massive” multiprocessors assembling multiple MicroBlaze in a Xilinx FPGA. they had applications in network processors. they were acquired by Arc in 2007

    • Reply
      mark

      encore still makes an eight cpu set up with the rtom and pci reflective memory they just go under the company name of compro computers still the fastes on the market 210% faster than the rsx

  • Reply
    nbk1

    Since you list several NPU vendors, I’d suggest to also add Intel-Fulcrum, CISCO, Alcatel-Lucent, as well as Tensilica, whose designs are certainly at the heart of quite some manycore CPU by various vendors, including but not limited to CISCO.

  • Reply
    nbk (@nbk1)

    Since you list several NPU vendors, I’d suggest to also add Alcatel-Lucent, Intel-Fulcrum, CISCO, and as well Tensilica, whose designs are certainly at the heart of quite some manycore CPU by various vendors, including but not limited to CISCO.

  • Reply
    Mark Boon

    In the ’80s you had transputers and a host of companies trying to build multi-processor systems with them. Inmos and Perihelion are the main ones that spring to mind that are not on your list. Your system needs more blinking lights. Perihelion had boxes with 50 flickering lights on them, one for each processor’s activity. Way cool :)

  • Reply
    Shaun James

    I recently purchased two Oracle/Sun Sparc T4-1 servers, each with eight cores, each core running eight threads. We have an in house application that at any time has 36 threads ready to run. The performance is insane as no thread has to wait for a time slice. I’d definately put the Sun T series on the success list. The T1 (about ten years old now) is open source too.

  • Reply
    Shaun James

    I agree with Pat.  I recently purchased two Oracle/Sun Sparc T4-1 servers, each with eight cores, each core running eight threads.  We have an in house application that at any time has 36 threads ready to run.  The performance is insane as no thread has to wait for a time slice.  I’d definately put the Sun T series on the success list.  The T1 is (was?)open source too, and from memory used less than 2W per thread, not too bad for an older technology.

  • Reply
    Shaun James

    I agree with Pat. I recently purchased two Oracle/Sun Sparc T4-1 servers, each with eight cores, each core running eight threads. We have an in house application that at any time has 36 threads ready to run. The performance is insane as no thread has to wait for a time slice. I’d definately put the Sun T series on the success list. The T1 is (was?)open source too, and from memory used less than 2W per thread, not too bad for an older technology.

  • Reply
    Mark

    The last of the DEC Alpha’s had data links and message routing hardware integrated on chip for “glueless” clusters.

Leave a Reply Using Facebook or Twitter Account